Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Looking for a woman > Female partner reproductive coercion

Female partner reproductive coercion

Site Logo

New Patient Appointment. Call Us: New Patient Appointment or Women's Health; Your Pregnancy Matters.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: What Exactly Is Reproductive Coercion - All Caught Up

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Women's Health - Reduce Reproductive Coercion and Intimate Partner Violence

Reproductive and Sexual Coercion

Site Logo

About half of all pregnancies in the U. While it would be easy to assume in these cases that birth control failed, or that people were simply careless, research on abusive relationships shows that a minority of these unintended pregnancies are the result of reproductive coercion.

Reproductive coercion is a specific type of intimate partner violence in which one partner forces unprotected sex in order to increase the chances that the other partner will get pregnant against her will. Defining this kind of abuse is important for both healthcare providers and women, explained Heather McCauley, a social epidemiologist and an assistant professor of human development at Michigan State University, who studies the phenomenon.

Forcing a woman to either carry a pregnancy to term or have an abortion against her wishes also constitutes reproductive coercion. We spoke to McCauley to learn more about reproductive coercion, and how to recognize the signs of a coerced pregnancy. How did you first realize that reproductive coercion was actually part of a pattern of abuse in intimate relationships? I was working with a team in Boston that was focused on violence against women, and I was focused mostly on physical and sexual intimate partner violence.

Elizabeth Miller, who at the time was at the University of California at Davis and is now at the University of Pittsburgh, had identified reproductive coercion in her work. So she approached our research team, and we were able to team up to better understand what this phenomenon was. I was pulled into this work in That first paper was the first time we were able to document that reproductive coercion was a phenomenon and it was happening to women more often than we even knew.

The purpose of this card is for clinicians to have the conversation with their patients. That is one sign that should tip the doctor off. And then the other part is that physically abusive manipulation of condoms to promote a pregnancy.

Are there scientifically backed ways to get the partner to stop doing reproductive coercion? Our team was the first to develop an intervention around reproductive coercion, but it was geared toward women seeking care in a reproductive health clinic.

What are the interventions for reproductive coercion with just the woman in the clinic? The first component is universal education. Providers are talking to all patients that walk into the door about relationships.

The point there is to help create a safe space within the clinical setting, so that we become comfortable sharing our experiences in our relationships with our health care providers. The second important goal with universal education is making sure that every patient who steps into the clinic is getting some sort of information about violence and reproductive coercion. The second piece is more a direct assessment. If a provider notices some of those clinical red flags that I mentioned, like a patient coming in frequently for pregnancy testing, or coming in frequently to change her birth control option — if that is going on, then a provider can do a more direct assessment using these questions to ask women about their experiences.

The third component is connecting women to resources. Other research on reproductive coercion indicates that a significant percentage of women who experience this are also in physically abusive relationships.

But can reproductive coercion happen in an otherwise loving relationship, or does it happen in an abusive relationship, of which reproductive coercion is just one aspect of abuse? We see both situations.

We know that in some [cases], women who experience reproductive coercion are also experiencing physical or sexual intimate partner violence. Women can experience reproductive coercion by itself. Can reproductive coercion happen to a man? Can he be part of a relationship and a pregnancy against his will, or in spite of his efforts to use contraception? The consequences are quite different for men and women with this behavior.

What else should we know about reproductive coercion? News U. HuffPost Personal Video Horoscopes. Newsletters Coupons. Follow Us. Part of HuffPost Wellness.

All rights reserved. Huffington Post. What about a medical history of several abortions? This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity. Suggest a correction.

Newsletter Sign Up. Successfully Subscribed!

What is reproductive coercion?

WomensLaw is not just for women. We serve and support all survivors, no matter their sex or gender. Important: Even if courts are closed, you can still file for a protection order and other emergency relief. Let us know: How can WomensLaw better serve you during these difficult times?

Read terms. This document reflects emerging clinical and scientific advances as of the date issued and is subject to change.

This abuse can range from birth control sabotage and pregnancy coercion to forced abortions or forced sexual coercion. Because the warning signs of reproductive coercion can be difficult to detect, this abuse tactic is often misunderstood and misinterpreted. For example, not all large families are a result of reproductive coercion, but for women experiencing this type of abuse, it is easy to mistake her large family as a plan rather than abuse. When a woman experiences reproductive coercion, her health is compromised and her ability to make decisions for herself are limited.

Reproductive coercion is abuse. But many women don’t even know it

About half of all pregnancies in the U. While it would be easy to assume in these cases that birth control failed, or that people were simply careless, research on abusive relationships shows that a minority of these unintended pregnancies are the result of reproductive coercion. Reproductive coercion is a specific type of intimate partner violence in which one partner forces unprotected sex in order to increase the chances that the other partner will get pregnant against her will. Defining this kind of abuse is important for both healthcare providers and women, explained Heather McCauley, a social epidemiologist and an assistant professor of human development at Michigan State University, who studies the phenomenon. Forcing a woman to either carry a pregnancy to term or have an abortion against her wishes also constitutes reproductive coercion. We spoke to McCauley to learn more about reproductive coercion, and how to recognize the signs of a coerced pregnancy. How did you first realize that reproductive coercion was actually part of a pattern of abuse in intimate relationships? I was working with a team in Boston that was focused on violence against women, and I was focused mostly on physical and sexual intimate partner violence.

What women and men need to know about reproductive coercion

These behaviours can include birth control sabotage where contraception is deliberately thrown away or tampered with , threats and use of physical violence if a woman insists on condoms or other forms of contraception, emotional blackmail coercing a woman to have sex or to fall pregnant, or to have an abortion as a sign of her love and fidelity, as well as forced sex and rape [1]. Reproductive coercion is an easy and effective and cowardly way of manipulating and controlling a woman by limiting her autonomy over her fertility and reproductive health and choices. Women can experience coercion from a partner to either become pregnant or progress with a pregnancy they do not want, or to terminate a pregnancy they wish to continue. It usually occurs within the context of relationships which are violent in other ways, as an additional tool used by perpetrators of violence.

Reproductive coercion is not a new phenomenon. But it was very recently recognised as a distinct type of domestic abuse, and only defined as a concept in , in a study in the journal Contraception.

Reproductive coercion also called coerced reproduction or reproductive control is a collection of behaviors that interfere with decision-making related to reproductive health. There are three forms of reproductive coercion, including pregnancy coercion, birth control sabotage, and controlling the outcome of a pregnancy. Reproductive coercion and intimate partner violence are strongly correlated; however, reproductive coercion can occur in relationships in which physical and sexual violence are not reported.

What Women Need To Know About Reproductive Coercion

.

.

Reproductive coercion

.

A growing body of research has recognized the connection between intimate partner violence and poor reproductive health outcomes for women. Intimate.

.

Reproductive Abuse and Coercion

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 5
  1. Zulkigami

    What do you advise to me?

  2. Vuzahn

    It is remarkable, very useful phrase

  3. Goltiktilar

    Yes it is a fantasy

  4. Shanris

    I congratulate, your idea simply excellent

  5. Fenrizil

    The duly answer

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.