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What does a female coil look like

An intrauterine device IUD is a contraceptive method designed to prevent unwanted pregnancy. If used correctly, you can have sex without the worry of getting pregnant or getting someone else pregnant. To help you make an informed choice about using contraceptive implants including the IUD, our resident pharmacist Rita Ghelani offers her expert advice:. A contraceptive coil IUD is a small plastic and copper device approximately the size of a matchstick that is fitted into the uterus.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Patient Education Video: Intrauterine Device (IUD)

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Hormonal coil (IUS)

The coil is just one of a whole host of contraception options for women. Choosing the right one for you can be a daunting task, but if you're considering going for the coil, one of the first things you need to be clear about are the possible side effects.

Dr Sonal Sha h , an NHS GP, spoke with Cosmopolitan UK about what to expect from the new contraception, and when you should seek help if you're worried about the effects it's having on your body:. The coil is a form of contraception used by thousands of women all over the world. It's a small, T-shaped plastic and copper device hence it's also known as the copper coil that's put into your womb by a doctor or nurse.

Before you have a coil inserted a doctor will take a thorough medical and sexual history to ensure that it is the safest option for you. They may also take some swabs to look for infection, or check to ensure there is no risk of pregnancy.

It is important to mention if you have had any unprotected sex or at risk of sexually transmitted infections. There are two types of intrauterine meaning inside the uterus coil; a copper coil, also known as the intrauterine device IUD and a hormonal coil, also known as the intrauterine system IUS. They both have slightly different mechanisms of action and therefore slightly different side-effect profiles.

The hormonal coil usually Mirena or Jaydess is also used as first line treatment for pain. The most common side effect from both coils is changes to bleeding patterns. Dr Sonal explains: "In the months following coil insertion, women may experience irregular , prolonged or frequent periods, but this usually improves with time.

However, as with any form of contraception, these can vary for each individual. And, while the Pill can increase your chances of developing breast cancer, Dr Sonal says: "There is no link between breast cancer and use of the hormonal coil. When inserted properly by a nurse or doctor, the risks of the IUS or IUD are extremely minimal; but, of course, there are things to be aware of. Following insertion, you'll be taught how to check that your coil is still in place.

Dr Sonal says: "In around 1 in 20, the coil may spontaneously expel it self and this is most common in the first year of use, particularly within 3 months of insertion. So it is important that you follow your doctor's advice and learn to check the coil strings regularly, particularly after your period.

There's also a very tiny chance that insertion could go wrong. However, doctors inserting the coil must have strict training and in experienced hands this is very unlikely. Oh, and you'll be glad to know that there's no existing evidence to support the idea that libido is affected with the use of the coil, so sex should feel entirely normal. If you're worried about any of the above, it's best to book an appointment with your GP to check things over.

Dr Sonal says:"Women should medical assistance at any time if they develop symptoms of pelvic infection pelvic pain, smelly vaginal discharge , or pain or any new abnormal bleeding. They can discuss with you whether the symptoms you are experiencing are because of the contraception. If you've done your research beforehand and feel that the coil is the right contraception for you, chances are you'll feel totally happy with your decision. Follow Abbi on Instagram. Type keyword s to search. Today's Top Stories.

Prince Harry is about to become a godfather again. Cardi B used Veet on her bikini line on Instagram. The best CBD products around. Getty Images. Dr Sonal Sha h , an NHS GP, spoke with Cosmopolitan UK about what to expect from the new contraception, and when you should seek help if you're worried about the effects it's having on your body: What is the coil? Related Story. Cosmopolitan UK Getty Images. Abigail Malbon Abbi is a freelance journalist for various magazines and websites.

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The coil: What is the difference between an IUD and an IUS?

The hormonal coil, also known as the IUS intrauterine system is a small T-shaped plastic device that sits in your womb and releases the progestogen hormone. It is long-acting and reversible, so you can take it out if you want to get pregnant. It is the sixth most popular method of contraception in the UK, and is becoming more popular, particularly amongst women over

Written by SpunOut View this authors Twitter page and posted in health. Depending on the device you get, it will release either copper IUD or a hormone called progestogen IUS to prevent pregnancy.

If you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily, or have certain cancers, don't use Mirena. If you have persistent pelvic or stomach pain or if Mirena comes out, tell your healthcare provider HCP Continue below. You may experience pain, bleeding or dizziness during and after placement. If your symptoms do not pass within 30 minutes after placement, Mirena may not have been placed correctly.

The contraceptive coil (IUD) explained

Back to Your contraception guide. An IUD is a small T-shaped plastic and copper device that's put into your womb uterus by a doctor or nurse. It releases copper to stop you getting pregnant, and protects against pregnancy for between 5 and 10 years. It's sometimes called a "coil" or "copper coil". The copper alters the cervical mucus, which makes it more difficult for sperm to reach an egg and survive. It can also stop a fertilised egg from being able to implant itself. If you're 40 or over when you have an IUD fitted, it can be left in until you reach the menopause or you no longer need contraception. An IUD can be fitted at any time during your menstrual cycle, as long as you're not pregnant. You'll be protected against pregnancy straight away. Before your IUD is fitted, a GP or nurse will check inside your vagina to check the position and size of your womb.

All the side effects of the contraceptive coil

The coil is just one of a whole host of contraception options for women. Choosing the right one for you can be a daunting task, but if you're considering going for the coil, one of the first things you need to be clear about are the possible side effects. Dr Sonal Sha h , an NHS GP, spoke with Cosmopolitan UK about what to expect from the new contraception, and when you should seek help if you're worried about the effects it's having on your body:. The coil is a form of contraception used by thousands of women all over the world.

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What is the copper coil? The copper coil is a small T-shaped plastic coil coated with copper. Like the hormonal coil, it is inserted into the womb, where it releases.

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Comments: 4
  1. Mujar

    In my opinion it is very interesting theme. I suggest all to take part in discussion more actively.

  2. Zulugar

    You not the expert?

  3. Tujinn

    This information is true

  4. Viktilar

    On mine it is very interesting theme. I suggest all to take part in discussion more actively.

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