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How does a girl get on her period

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If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works. A period, or menstruation, is the shedding of the lining of the womb. Menstruation is also known as menses. Menses are part of normal sexual health for women during their reproductive years. Menstruation that includes bleeding from the vagina is found mainly among humans and similar animals, such as primates.

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Your First Period

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How can I track my period on a calendar? What personal care products are available for me during my menstrual period? Does having a period cause pain or discomfort? Starting your menstrual period is one of these changes. When puberty begins, your brain signals your body to produce hormones.

Some of these hormones prepare your body each month for a possible pregnancy. This is called the menstrual cycle. Hormones cause the lining of the uterus to become thicker with extra blood and tissue. One of your ovaries then releases an egg. This is called ovulation. The egg moves down one of the two fallopian tubes toward the uterus.

The lining of the uterus breaks down and flows out of the body through your vagina. Most girls start their periods between the ages of 12 years and 13 years, but some start earlier or later. When you first start having your period, it may last only a few days. Your first few periods may be very light. You may only see a few spots of reddish brown blood. Anywhere from 2 to 7 days is normal.

A menstrual cycle is counted from the first day of bleeding in one month to the first day of bleeding in the next month. The average menstrual cycle is about 28 days, but cycles that are 21—45 days also are normal. It may take 6 years or more after your period starts for your cycle to get regular. If you track your period every month, you may notice a pattern.

It may become easier to tell when you will get your next period. Check online or on your smart phone for apps that can help you track your period. To track your period on a calendar, mark the first day your bleeding starts on a calendar with an "X. Count the first "X" as day 1. Keep counting the days until you have your next period. Pads are used to soak up the menstrual flow. Tampons and menstrual cups catch the flow from inside your vagina. Pads, tampons, and menstrual cups can be used at different times.

Some also can be used together. Pads are worn inside your underwear to collect your menstrual flow. They come in different sizes, styles, and thicknesses. Some have extra material on the sides called "wings" that fold over the edges of your underwear to help keep the pad in place and give better protection. A thinner, shorter version of a pad is a "panty liner.

Change your pad at least every 4—8 hours or whenever it seems full or feels wet and uncomfortable. Some girls change their pads each time they urinate. Some tampons have a plastic or cardboard applicator tube that helps slide the tampon in place. Some tampons do not have applicators and are inserted with just your fingers.

A short string attached to the end of the tampon hangs out of your vagina to help you remove it later. Just like pads, tampons come in different sizes for heavier and lighter periods. The tampon package will tell you how much fluid it will absorb. A "super" tampon, for example, is thicker and is meant for heavy flow. A "slim" or "junior" tampon is slender and is meant for lighter flow. You should change your tampon at least every 4—8 hours.

Leaving a tampon in for a long time has been linked to toxic shock syndrome. When your flow is heavier, you may need to change it more often. Menstrual cups are made of plastic or rubber. They are inserted into the vagina to catch the menstrual flow. You remove and empty the cup every 8—12 hours.

Some cups are used only once and thrown away. Others can be washed and reused. Some girls have a cramping pain in the lower abdomen or back or breast tenderness just before and during their periods.

Others get headaches or feel dizzy. Some get nausea or diarrhea. If these problems do not go away after treatment or if you cannot go to school or do your normal activities, you should talk to your doctor. Amenorrhea means not having a period. It is normal for some girls not to start their periods until age 16 years. But you should see your doctor if you have not started your period by age 15 years.

You also should see your doctor if you have started your period but it then stops for more than 3 months. If you are bleeding so much that you need to change your pad or tampon every 1—2 hours or if your period lasts for more than 7 days, you should see your doctor. See your doctor right away if you are light-headed, dizzy, or have a racing pulse.

You should tell your doctor if your periods are usually regular but then become irregular for several months. You also should see your doctor if your period comes more often than every 21 days or less often than every 45 days. Amenorrhea: The absence of menstrual periods in women of reproductive age. Egg: The female reproductive cell made in and released from the ovaries. Also called the ovum. Fallopian Tubes: Tubes through which an egg travels from the ovary to the uterus.

Hormones: Substances made in the body that control the function of cells or organs. Ovaries: Organs in women that contain the eggs necessary to get pregnant and make important hormones, such as estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. Puberty: The stage of life when the reproductive organs start to function and other sex features develop.

For women, this is the time when menstrual periods start and the breasts develop. Toxic Shock Syndrome: A severe illness caused by a bacterial infection. It can be caused by leaving a tampon in the vagina too long. Uterus: A muscular organ in the female pelvis. During pregnancy, this organ holds and nourishes the fetus. Vagina: A tube-like structure surrounded by muscles. The vagina leads from the uterus to the outside of the body. It is not intended as a statement of the standard of care, nor does it comprise all proper treatments or methods of care.

Bulk pricing was not found for item. Please try reloading page. Clinical Topics. Share Facebook Twitter Email Print. What is puberty? What is a menstrual period? When will I start my period? How long do periods last? How often will I get my period? Why is it a good idea to track my period? How are pads used? How often should I change my pad?

How are tampons used? How do I choose a tampon? How often should I change my tampon? What are menstrual cups? What is amenorrhea? What if I am having heavy bleeding? What if I have irregular periods? Glossary What is puberty? To help ease cramps, you can try the following: Take ibuprofen or naproxen sodium if you do not have an allergy to aspirin or severe asthma.

Body Stuff

Learn more. Menstruation a period is a major stage of puberty in girls. It's one of the many physical signs that a girl is turning into a woman.

Every month, in the years between puberty typically age 11 to 14 and menopause typically about age 51 , your body readies itself for pregnancy. The lining of your uterus thickens and an egg grows and is released from one of your ovaries. The average woman loses about two to three tablespoons of blood during her period.

Back to Periods. Most girls start their periods when they're about 12, but they can start as early as 8, so it's important to talk to girls from an early age to make sure they're prepared before the big day. Many parents feel awkward talking about periods, especially with pre-teen girls, who can seem to get easily embarrassed. One way round this is to respond to questions or opportunities as they arise. David Kesterton, who organises the FPA's Speakeasy courses — which teach parents how to talk to their children about puberty, sex and relationships — says clear speaking and down-to-earth, age-appropriate language is key.

When will I get my first period?

The average American girl will experience her first menstrual period, known as menarche, between the ages of 12 and 13 years old according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. However, some girls can experience this life event much sooner. Sara Kreckman , UnityPoint Health pediatrician. In most cases, there is no obvious or abnormal reason for why the body has started producing these hormones early, although body weight, heredity, ethnicity and activity can be important factors, according to Dr. However, if a child develops breast buds before age 8 or periods before age 9, Dr. Kreckman advises a visit to your provider. Kreckman says. Kristin Millin, pediatrician, echoes that sentiment.

10 Common Period Questions

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Forget that serious "menstruation talk" — here's how to really open the lines of communication and help your daughter cope with her first period. That very first period can come as quite a surprise to a young girl.

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What happens during the typical 28-day menstrual cycle?

It signals the beginning of a long phase of life around 40 years! This means that if you have sexual contact, you might get pregnant. While you may have learned about menstruation in school, you probably have questions about what to expect.

Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions. You may want to look at their policies. Period questions come into every girls mind! Puberty can be pretty crazy — you shouldn't have to worry about your first period on top of it all. This tissue comes from the uterus, which is where a baby fetus can develop in the female body. Every month or so, the uterus lining gets thicker to prepare for a fertilized egg if the woman becomes pregnant.

Why Do Women Have Periods?

Your child will go through lots of changes in puberty. One of the most significant milestones is her first period. Most of the blood and tissue comes out in the first couple of days, but some girls will continue to have bleeding for up to seven days. The amount of bleeding varies. If a girl has a major growth spurt and has grown some underarm hair, periods are likely to be just around the corner. Cycles are usually between 25 and 35 days. But girls might not get regular periods for the first few years, so their cycles might change from one period to the next. Irregular cycles can be as short as 21 days, and as long as 45 days or even longer.

This patient FAQ explains what's to be expected during your first period. If the egg is not fertilized with a man's sperm, pregnancy does not occur. Most girls start their periods between the ages of 12 years and 13 years, but some start It may take 6 years or more after your period starts for your cycle to get regular.

People especially girls talk a lot about periods. But what exactly is a period and what makes it happen? A period is the 2 to 7 days that a girl or woman experiences menstrual flow — blood and tissue that leaves the body through the vagina. For most girls, it amounts to about 2 tablespoons 30 milliliters. To catch the blood and prevent stains on her clothes, a girl can wear a pad, which sticks to her underwear, or a tampon, which is inserted into the vagina.

A period is a release of blood from a girl's uterus , out through her vagina. It is a sign that she is getting close to the end of puberty. There is a lot to learn about periods.

How can I track my period on a calendar? What personal care products are available for me during my menstrual period? Does having a period cause pain or discomfort?

A period is when blood comes out through a girl's vagina. It is a sign that she is getting close to the end of puberty.

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